All About Japan

5 Ways to Recover From Your Shibuya Hangover

| Nightlife , Shibuya
5 Ways to Recover From Your Shibuya Hangover

Shibuya is the equivalent of NYC's Times Square: flashy, noisy and crowded. While unnerving for some, it's the best place to party for those who love nightlife. But what if you couldn't keep up with the Japanese way of nomikai (drinking parties)? We've got five ways for you to get over your hangover fast.

5. Recharge in Wired Café

5. Recharge in Wired Café

At the end of a long night in Shibuya, you'll probably have two problems: a dead-drunk body and a dead phone battery, which means not being able to contact family or friends about your whereabouts. Wired Café, a well-known spot for those needing Wi-Fi, is conveniently located by Shibuya Station in the same building as the famous Shibuya Crossing Starbucks. Open until 2 a.m., this spot serves drinks that could help you rehydrate and stave off a potential hangover. It's an ideal charging station because you can recharge your body while using the available outlets to recharge your mobile phone too. But while you're sitting there waiting to get your power back, please don't succumb to drunk texting a frenemy, your boss, or, especially, an ex.

4. Replenish in HangOut HangOver

Shibuya is the place to be to get both a hangover and the cure, ironically. In fact, it's so well known for the latter that one café has decided to call itself HangOut HangOver, which lives up to its name. Since it's open until 12 a.m., it's a good place to refill your tummy with something solid after a night of drinking all that toxic liquid. They have a good tuna bowl on the menu and a wide assortment of filling appetizers and desserts like a decadent Lemon Cheesecake, which has enough sourness and sugar to awaken your sleepy nerves.

3. Listen to Classical Music at Café Mame-Hico

3. Listen to Classical Music at Café Mame-Hico

Café Mame-Hico is the best place to unplug after a night of chaotic partying. Soothe yourself with classical music, good coffee and a restful interior. Tucked between the quieter streets of Shibuya, this café might bring to mind a secret hideaway of your favorite European literary greats like Shakespeare or Chaucer. While this shop closes at 10 p.m., an hour later than your usual coffee shops, it's ideal for a quick dose of caffeine and peace of mind before hitting the last trains. This is a good place to allow your hangover-prevention drink to do its work before you head home or straight to work after spending the night somewhere.

2. Get a Cortado from Gorilla

2. Get a Cortado from Gorilla

No, you don't need to go to the zoo after a night of partying like a wild animal. Gorilla Coffee is a Brooklyn-born coffee shop offering some of the strongest coffee in Shibuya. Its popular espresso drink "cortado" is perfect to keep you awake without overwhelming you with more acidity (from all night of drinking) because it's a strong espresso diluted with equal parts milk.

- gorillacoffee.jp (Japanese)

1. Chill at a Net Café

1. Chill at a Net Café

Japan's internet cafés are probably unlike the ones you'll find abroad. It's easy to find these among the bright lights of Shibuya. Look for colorful signs saying インターネット (literally, internet) or マンガ喫茶 (manga kissa) by the entrance points of buildings, leading to a stairway or an elevator. Places like Manboo in Shibuya charge ¥100-400 per person, per hour. A few hours of waiting for train operations to resume while resting here is way cheaper than staying in a hotel, and perhaps more entertaining. Each cubicle has a computer where you can watch movies or read manga comics all night, while comfortably sitting on reclining chairs (some locations even have flat mats to sleep on or pair cubicles to relax with a friend). Some internet cafés also have food, soup, coffee and even "hangover drinks" for nutrient replenishment. Also, a lot of these cafés have shower cubicles! Just purchase a shirt and undergarments from a nearby convenience store, wash up at a net café, and you're ready for another day!

- www.manboo.co.jp (Japanese)