All About Japan

3 Japanese Sauces to Spice Up Your Burger

| Food & Drink , Burgers
3 Japanese Sauces to Spice Up Your Burger

Want something beyond ketchup to throw on your burger? Why not dip into the delicious world of Japanese sauces! You're sure to find a unique flavor that will strike your fancy—and with the recipes below, you can prepare your own wherever you are!

'Sauce'

'Sauce' is a little confusing. That's just what it's called in Japanese—sauce. This is sometimes translated as "Japanese Worcestershire-style sauce," which isn't far off, but the Japanese version is a lot thicker, sweeter and browner. You'll find it slathered on savory okonomiyaki pancakes and topping hambaagu, or Japanese-style hamburger steaks, as well as on other dishes.

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So what if you don't have a grocery store that carries 'sauce'? You can find a simple, five-minute recipe for a tonkatsu variant below. All you need is soy sauce, Worcestershire sauce, ketchup, mirin, sugar, Dijon mustard and a pinch of garlic powder. Enjoy!

Read full story: www.seriouseats.com

Teriyaki Sauce

In Japanese, teriyaki (照り焼き) actually describes a cooking method, not a sauce—in fact, Japanese grocery stores don't carry bottles teriyaki sauce unless they're imported. Teri (照り) means luster and yaki (焼き) just means grilled, broiled or pan-fried, and when food is prepared teriyaki style, it just means it's seasoned with soy sauce, sake and mirin.

The seasoning for teriyaki cooking will be a little different depending on what you're using it for. If you want details on a fantastic recipe that doesn't even need sake, check out Just One Cookbook below. And once you're done, you can also find Nami's great teriyaki burger recipe here!

Read full story: www.justonecookbook.com

Japanese-Style Mayo

Japanese-style mayonnaise has a smoother and thinner consistency, a tangier character, and a certain depth of spices that distinguish it from its American cousin. If you want to make it from scratch, you need a pretty specific set of ingredients, so get ready to look for hon-dashi and MSG, then bust out egg yolks, garlic powder, Kosher salt, two kinds of vinegar and Japanese mustard powder. But once you've got it all together, it just takes 10 minutes to make a cup of this topping in your own kitchen. Slather away!

Read full story: www.seriouseats.com